Chronic illness

Lies Able-bodied People Believe

If this describes you read this.


Let’s talk about the myths that abled-bodied people ignorantly believe about disabled or chronically ill/ chronic pain suffering people. To make it easier to follow I’ll make it in list form.

1. “Because we are are disabled our minds don’t work correctly therefore we can’t be smart or defend ourselves and if we can, we aren’t disabled.” Okay first, there are mentally disabled people but that also doesn’t mean that they aren’t smart or that they can’t understand when you speak to them. Second, someone can be only physically disabled. That means that when you talk about that person whether they are mentally or physically disabled they can hear you and they are human just like you. Depending on the person, if they can say something, they will do something about your ignorance. And just because we can tell you to stop being an asshole doesn’t mean that all of a sudden we can walk or suddenly we are healed from our conditions. Think my friends, think.

Me, a disabled woman, traveling.


2. “Disabled/ chronically ill people can’t travel.” Travel is possible for us. It might be harder and we need accommodations but that doesn’t mean we can’t or shouldn’t! Our lives have been restricted enough so when you have a chance to live outside of your routine, you would take it. Especially if most of your life is going to be full of pain, sleeping, pills, doctors, needles, and surgery. Disabled people deserve a vacation too.

Me volunteering at Feed My Starving Children


3. “They like being sick because they like the attention.” I’m not saying that there might be some person out there like this, but I have never met someone who hasn’t been praying and crying because they can’t take this life anymore. People have committed suicide so that the pain would finally end. I don’t care if you think they are being over dramatic, they are fighting off their own body every second of everyday. Do not insult anyone going through chronic illness or disability by telling them that they enjoy feeling like they are being ripped to pieces every day because people to glance at them. Most of the time our attention is our caregivers dressing us or cleaning us or it’s people starring at us and judging us because we are parked in a disabled spot and we don’t have a wheelchair or because we have medical equipment sticking out of us and they think starring with a sick look on their face helps us with the fact that we have no choice in the matter.

Me enjoying a concert. Yes I am still disabled


4. “You are laughing and smiling so you must be fine.” Here’s something for ableists to remember, WE ARE NEVER FINE. We show you smiles and laughs because you don’t have the capacity to handle a mere description of how we feel. We never have a pain free minute. And sometime being distracted and laughing at something else helps us not focus on the fact that we are going to live like we just got hit by a train for the rest of our lives. If we lived 24/7 showing our emotions and truly feeling them, I think we would kill ourselves. 

5. “People with disabilities don’t work as well as able-bodied workers.” I’m just going to put this quote right here… “In several studies, including those previously mentioned, it was found that 91% of the workers with disabilities scored average or better when compared with the general workforce. Their attendance is also better.”

Just saying…

This is how I’m going to look at you if you speak for me.


6. “We have to talk for the disabled and chronically ill because they are just incapable.” Can I just say that when you speak for another person, you are telling them that they are not needed there and that they are useless. They know more about their lives than you do, so shut it and let them be a social being. When people start speaking for me, I make sure that they know that everything that they just said was not correct and/ or I tell them that my nervous system is broken not my mouth. We will stand up for ourselves.

I have only mascara on. You see how sexy beautiful I am. Yes I am still disabled.


7. “Disabled people are ugly and lazy.” Okay just like everyone else, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Not everyone who is disabled looks the same. Not everyone who is disabled IS the same. We have faces just like everyone else and being disabled doesn’t effect our sexiness. We wear the same clothes, we wear makeup just like you, and we come in all different shapes and sizes JUST LIKE YOU. We just want to be treated normally and also have our disabilities and illnesses respected. Just because I feel too physically sick to wash the dishes doesn’t mean that I’m choosing to lay down and pass out. Laziness is a choice of not doing your responsibilities, when it’s not a choice you can’t label me as lazy. You can label me as not able, aka disabled… See how that works?

You know how long it took me to get my hair and makeup done? It was hard and stressful. Not lazy. Yes definitely still disabled and chronically ill.


I know that there is so so much more I could mention and rant about. If you have some that I didn’t mention or you want to rant off of one of these rants, comment your hearts out below. I love hearing about your opinions and stories. Don’t be afraid to ask questions either! I just got really tired of ignorant people this week and wanted to make some things very clear.

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Chronic illness

Remember the Facts


It’s difficult to remember the fact that I am not like able-bodied people. That I, in fact, cannot carry a half empty suitcase or look for high heels to match my outfits. I have to remind myself that the taller I stand, the harder I fall. That my joints hurt when I stand in gym shoes for less then 5 minutes. I have to remember that I am not healthy and that my body is described as broken.  In my childlike mind I am acceptable, society is forgiving, and there is faith in humanity. 

That’s just it isn’t it, I’m not a child anymore and I have missing pieces. I’m like an Xbox with no memory, I can play the game but I can never remember my place. My mouth is a broken record with endless power supply. I will never take no for an answer. This is what makes me a deadly combination. My insides constantly need attention and resources to survive. My mind always has a plan to take advantage of its opportunities with no thought of who it’s taking advantage of. Give my mind the task of helping my body survive and hell would break loose.

I need to remember that people are not like me. They can look good every day. They can work and get paychecks. They can stay awake without fainting. They can wake up without nausea and pain. I forget that I can’t stand without dizziness. That I’ll never be able to run again. That I have to use a wheelchair when on vacation or going on long outings. That one day the wheelchair might be permanent. I forget that I can’t take care of my own life. That I may never be able to have the job of my dreams or go through college. I forget that I am disabled. The opposite of able. 

I need to remember how much of a responsibility I am. That I have to go ten times further then every one else, work ten times harder then everyone else. All to end up at the same finish line. I also need to realize that I was given super human amounts of tolerance, determination, and strength. That I can stand for 2 hours during a concert while my back spasms, my joints scrape together, and my sciatic nerve won’t stop screaming. That just meant that I would scream louder because I knew that I would remember that night. I knew I would never regret that night no matter how long I couldn’t walk afterward because for one night I lived through a future memory that wouldn’t be about me taking my medicine or having to cancel my plans so I could throw up at home. 

It’s difficult to remember the fact that I am not like able-bodied people because I am no less than them and I’m too busy enjoying the passion of the moments to notice our differences. So I guess they don’t really matter.

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Chronic illness

The Gone Me

Part of me wishes that all of this never happened to me. At the same time, I know for a fact that I would not be where I am with God with out the bad things I have endured and am still enduring. I have seen myself without God and I was absolutely disgusting. He knew that the only way that I would come to him was allowing chronic illness and pain to be a constant thorn in my side. I am so happy that he did it so early in my lifetime so that I would know him earlier and have the possibility of getting to know him and grow through out a whole lifetime. Yes there are parts of me that are gone that I wish I could have back, like my active side and the part of me that could be outside for hours. The part of me that could stay up all night and all day to get things done, and the part of me that could make 3 different plans with 3 different people in one day. But I have to sacrifice those and the evil, sinful parts that thought it was okay to be sexually explicit, that it was okay to lie to and hit my mom just because I could, and the parts that thought it was okay to lie to and hurt people just because I could or because I didn’t like them. I have to sacrifice both because they go hand in hand. Once I did, God made a way for me to not go backwards. I’m chronically ill and I believe and fear the Lord. They go hand in hand. He’s not punishing me for my sin, that’s not what I’m saying. He’s allowed my situation to become a way of honoring him. And God has made it so that there is no way I could choose to go backwards. My life now is a million times better then it was. How could I go back?

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